Patiently Impatient*

You can listen to the audio here

Isaiah was reminiscing the good old days here. The good old days he perhaps had never seen. If we look at our Hebrew Bible history, this communal lament in Isaiah lies between the exile of Judah and Israel and before the rebuilding of the temple. The economy was ruined, the nation state was no more, and Isaiah stood among the ruins with the people, wondering the questions all of us ask when we can see nothing good. Both the religious and political leaders cared more for their own monetary gain than the people. The Hebrews had returned to Zion, only to find it in ruins. Why doesn’t God show up? Why does God remain hidden? Continue reading “Patiently Impatient*”

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On Julian of Norwich

Recently, Dr. W. Travis McMaken at Lindenwood University, where I’m currently adjuncting, asked if we could have a conversation on Julian of Norwich, who features prominently in my research. I said sure, and it’s now on Youtube.

This year, I’ve presented three papers on Julian of Norwich, comparing her theology to Augustine (AAR Midwest); Anne Dutton (NABPR); and Paul Fiddes (Young Scholars in the Baptist Academy). All of these figures speak about theosis, though not as we may expect.

There are many things I appreciate about Julian.  She is a theologian, teacher, and a pastor. Her writings articulate her care for her community, her awe of God, and her desire to express the Triune God’s extravagant love to a people whose parents had witnessed the plague; whose church had been less than trustworthy, and whose leaders were intent on maintaining the status quo.

Here’s the video:  Continue reading “On Julian of Norwich”

God is…. (A sermon on the Trinity)

This sermon was preached on May 22, 2016 at Dayspring Baptist Church, St. Louis, MO on Psalm 8. You may have seen bits of this sermon from other sermons.

I have a confession to make. I like to doodle. I doodle during sermons. My PhD supervisor, who doesn’t allow electronics of any kind in the classroom, will allow doodling, because it gets the brain thinking in different ways. In Sunday School, when I was teaching on the mystic Hildegard last week, we learned how artwork causes us to think about God in different ways. I’m not a very good artist, so maybe I’ll pick out a word that I connect to the sermon and write it in different ways. Or, like last week during Pentecost, I drew images of the Holy Spirit: flames, a dove, etc. So, if you feel comfortable, whether you are young, or old, feel free to doodle in your worship guide as we explore with the Psalmist who God is, and who we are, through thinking about the Trinity.

the-true-trinity-in-true-unity-1165
Hildegard’s icon of the Trinity in her Scivias. Source

What is the Trinity, anyway?

Continue reading “God is…. (A sermon on the Trinity)”